Fixing filesystem check or mount fail

Beginners on Linux will probably encounter a file system check or mount fail at least once throughout their experience. I know I did. Multiple times. But it’s hard to get around hard shut downs when your computer just freezes! Now some people might just press i to ignore every time. Others blindly follow guides, unaware of the effects on their computer.

I for one want to know what the commands I type actually do. So without much further ado, with reference to Simon Richter’s reply on an Ask Ubuntu thread, here’s how you can resolve the issue permanently (complete with explanations of each command):

Step 1: Boot up Computer

Press that power button. 😉

Step 2: Enter Manual Recovery Mode

In the GNU GRUB boot loader, press m to enter manual recovery mode.

Step 3: Remount the System

Remount your system to read-only mode. This will prevent the kernel from writing any permanent changes that could harm your system.

  • mount is the command.
  • -o allows you to specify mount options.
    • ro is the read-only option.
    • remount is the option to remount an already mounted system.
  • / is the mount point for the entire system.
mount -o ro,remount /

Step 4: Repair the System

Run the file system consistency check and interactive repair. You do not need to understand all the underlying semantics of fsck but understand that fsck possesses a set of standards for file systems and ensures all the files on your system follow that standard.

  • fsck is the repair command.
  • -f is the flag to also check clean files.
fsck -f

Step 5: Write the Changes

Write the changes to your system by using a sync.


Step 6: Reboot Computer.

Reboot the system and all changes should be implemented.


Next time you turn on your computer, everything should be running smoothly!


Installing Android Studio on Linux Mint 17.1 (Rebecca)

Hello everyone,

This summer I’m learning to develop applications.

My choice of tools are Android Studio and Oracle JDK.

I found a tutorial that is quite good by retired IT professional, Ridzwan Abdullah. However, since some of the commands have been updated, the site is a bit outdated.

Here’s how I did it →

adduser sincerelypeggy

We now have a female on our team! Here’s Peggy, who will be sharing her experiences with Linux Mint. —tPenguinLTG

My name is Peggy. I’m dual-booting Windows with Linux because of successful coercion by tPenguinLTG (I’m kidding).

I became interested in Linux because the operating system is Unix-like without compromising the customization of my desktop.

I’m using the Linux Mint distro because it gives me an understanding of Linux without having to get into the nitty-gritty.

I can’t wait to share my experiences with everyone~



Linux Distros: What are the differences and how do I choose one?

Linux distro stickers

Ask a newcomer about Linux and they’ll probably mention something about Ubuntu. Someone a little more knowledgeable about Linux will know that there are many flavours, called “distributions” (or “distros”, for short), of Linux. There are over six hundred distributions out there, and they’re all labelled as “Linux”. What makes one distro different from the next, and how do you choose one?
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Penguins help clean up broken glass

Earlier this week, my friend brought his laptop to me because Windows 8 refused to boot after a restart. He had attempted to repair it himself, but ended up making things worse, to the point that the manufacturer recovery console and the Windows 8 installer wouldn’t even boot. Thankfully for him, I had the power of Linux with me and we were able to revive his laptop very easily.

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