Installing Android Studio on Linux Mint 17.1 (Rebecca)

Hello everyone,

This summer I’m learning to develop applications.

My choice of tools are Android Studio and Oracle JDK.

I found a tutorial that is quite good by retired IT professional, Ridzwan Abdullah. However, since some of the commands have been updated, the site is a bit outdated.

Here’s how I did it →

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adduser sincerelypeggy

We now have a female on our team! Here’s Peggy, who will be sharing her experiences with Linux Mint. —tPenguinLTG


My name is Peggy. I’m dual-booting Windows with Linux because of successful coercion by tPenguinLTG (I’m kidding).

I became interested in Linux because the operating system is Unix-like without compromising the customization of my desktop.

I’m using the Linux Mint distro because it gives me an understanding of Linux without having to get into the nitty-gritty.

I can’t wait to share my experiences with everyone~

Peggy

Good riddance to PulseAudio! (or “Settling on a Linux sound server”)

I have a love-hate relationship with PulseAudio: it has a lot of great features, but sometimes it’s more resource-hungry than I would like, and it also crashes more often than I’d like. Actually, the only reason why I got PulseAudio was because Skype 4.3.0.37 required Pulse and dropped ALSA support; I would have stayed with plain ALSA had it not been for Skype (on that note, I really hate Skype, for more reasons than one).

PulseAudio logo

PulseAudio

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Move and resize windows from anywhere

Move this window. Go ahead, I’ll wait. Great. Now resize this window.

If you’re like most people, you moved the window by dragging the title bar and resized by dragging the edge or corner of the window. That works and all, but you have to move your mouse to the right spots, which may very well be at the opposite end of the screen, and what do you do if you find yourself with a title bar past the top of your screen?

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Command Explained: “Look Busy On *nix”

Here’s a command that I posted on my main blog last year. Open a terminal and give it a try (stop it with Ctrl+C)!
$ cat /dev/urandom | hexdump -C | grep "34 32"

`The Penguin' says...

I recently posted a command to “Look Busy On *nix“:
$ cat /dev/urandom | hexdump -C | grep "34 32"

If you ran it, you console/terminal screen should have been filled with lines like these:

I will break apart the command and explain what it actually did.

$
Indicates that this command should be run as a regular user (i.e. without root privileges). This isn’t actually part of the command and shouldn’t be included when typing it into the shell.
cat
Output the contents of the specified file(s) to stdout.
/dev/urandom
The file from which to read. /dev/urandom is a special file that acts as a pseudo-random number generator.
|
Redirects or “pipes” the output of the previous command into the input of the next command (stdout to stdin).
hexdump
Outputs a hexdump of the specified file, or stdin if no file specified.
-C
From the man page:

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Linux Distros: What are the differences and how do I choose one?

Linux distro stickers

Ask a newcomer about Linux and they’ll probably mention something about Ubuntu. Someone a little more knowledgeable about Linux will know that there are many flavours, called “distributions” (or “distros”, for short), of Linux. There are over six hundred distributions out there, and they’re all labelled as “Linux”. What makes one distro different from the next, and how do you choose one?
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