Meet Topanga, my Arch Linux Boot!

Happy New Year everyone!

A lot happened in 2015 for me, especially in the computer side of things.

My Hewlett Packard (HP Pavilion m6 w/ AMD Quad Core A8 4500M APU @ 2.0GHz and AMD Radeon Dedicated Graphics (1GB) w/ 8GB RAM) finally gave up on me. To summarize, I dropped my laptop in high school and damaged the left hinge. By construction, the fan is placed underneath. As much as this truly sounds like a problem, during that time I didn’t think too much about it.

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Package Management Systems Explained

Any Linux user should be familiar with package management systems. After all, they are a key component of every Linux distro.

Package management systems are an effective way to organize packages for installation, upgrade and deletion.

Package management systems have three sub-components: repositories, packages and package managers. A repository is a database of packages that users can search, download and install. A package contains the files for a particular program along with metadata that includes the package’s name, size and dependencies. When a user wants to install a package, the package manager will automatically search the repositories and install any missing dependencies.

As a user of Linux Mint, the package manager I’m familiar with is APT/dpkg through Synaptic. While I have no experience using existing elements to integrate into my own programming, I can comment on the advantages and disadvantages that a package management system for a Windows-adapted user.

Advantages

1) Easy installation, upgrade and deletion.

One of the most annoying parts about installing, upgrading or deleting anything on Windows is browsing through all the different options available and figuring out which programs go hand-in-hand with one another.

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